Kenya

Map of Kenya

Country Initiatives Details

Adaptation to Social, Environmental and Climate Change Impacts on Vector-Borne Diseases in Africa

Canada’s Total Contribution: $7,500,000

Targeted Countries: Botswana Côte d'Ivoire Kenya Mauritania South Africa Tanzania Zimbabwe

Funding Period: 2011/2012

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

Canada provided $7.5 million to the International Development Research Centre's (IDRC) Ecosystems and Human Health Program to support health vulnerabilities reduction and increased resilience against vector-borne disease risks under climate change conditions in Africa. The initiative used a multi-pronged approach to explore how to improve disease control strategies and tools, and increase the capacity to generate, interpret, and use new knowledge to inform policies and practices.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Canada’s contribution to this project supported research to assist African countries in developing adaptation policies and disease control programs to anticipate, prevent, and reduce vector-borne disease risks. The initiative is expected to train African researchers to build national capacity to deal with climate change and related public health threats.

Five research projects have been selected for funding under this initiative. These projects worked to:
  • assess the impact of social and environmental determinants and climate change on malaria and schistosomiasis in Botswana, South Africa, and Zimbabwe
  • develop/improve appropriate tools and coping strategies to the aggravating effects of climate change on the transmission of vector-borne diseases, especially malaria and schistosomiasis diseases in the towns of Korhogo (Côte d'Ivoire) and Kaédides (Mauritania)
  • look at the impact of expanding agricultural development, climate change, and tsetse fly distribution while focusing on marginalised people in remote areas
  • address the potential effect of climate change on diseases such as malaria and Rift Valley Fever in Kenya
  • look into climate and land use changes effects on the Maasai population.

African Adaptation Research Centres: Enhancing Climate Change Adaptation in Agriculture and Water Resources in the Greater Horn of Africa

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,340,000

Targeted Countries: Ethiopia Kenya Sudan Tanzania

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

Flooding and seasonal droughts are undermining the economies and prosperity of countries within the Greater Horn of Africa. Agriculture and water resources are among the key sectors which will be affected most by the impacts of projected climate change. To serve as practical roadmaps for future investments, National Adaptation Programs of Action (NAPAs) need to be strengthened by economic analysis of adaptation investments, and informed by credible and impartial scientific assessment of climate change impacts. This project measured the impacts of climate change on agriculture and water resources, and recommends feasible adaptation options in Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, and Tanzania. Support provided to the Sokoine University of Agriculture of Tanzania is part of Canada's $10 million Fast-start contribution to the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) to support the African Adaptation Research Centres Initiative

Results/Expected Outcomes

With support from Canada's contribution, this project is expected to improve current estimates of adaptation costs and benefits and undertake additional modelling work in specific locations and sectors within each study country. The researchers and postgraduate students involved have been trained in the use of the modelling tools and large-scale assessment methodologies, and a database for large-scale climate change impact assessment is currently being developed. In Kenya, the team is directly involved with all matters related to climate change issues in agriculture and was involved with the development of the National Climate Change Action Plan. In Ethiopia, the project's interim results have been presented at the annual forum of the Research Extension and Farmers Linkage Council (REFLAC), which included participation from key policy-makers. In Sudan, the team has been invited to work as consultants in the development of a US$5.7 million project proposal on “Climate Risk Finance for Sustainable and Climate Resilient Rainfed Farming and Pastoral Systems” to be submitted to Global Environment Facility (GEF) by October 2013.

Supporting Green Housing in Kenya

Canada’s Total Contribution: $4,000,000

Targeted Countries: Kenya

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Project Funded through a Canadian Facility: IFC - Canada Climate Change Program (CCCP)

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

The IFC-Canada Climate Change Program provided support to a local financial intermediary, to enter the country’s emerging green housing market and encourage property developers to build eco-friendly homes. The program funds will enable the bank to grow its mortgage and property development finance business, and include green elements in a portion of their new housing portfolio. Ultimately, the project is expected to demonstrate the economic benefits of green housing to mortgage providers, developers and homebuyers so that they are willing to incorporate and pay for green enhancements on a commercial basis.

Results/Expected Outcomes

With Canada's contribution, this project expects to increase access to affordable housing and to help grow the housing supply in Kenya through on-lending to property developers. In addition, it is expected to abate greenhouse gas emissions and facilitate energy efficient housing developments, therefore introducing and promoting a new sustainable housing product into the Kenyan market. With support from Canada, this project is expected to mobilize an additional $1.04 million in co-financing from public and private sources and lead to an estimated greenhouse gas emissions reduction of 1,800 metric tons of CO2 per year.*
Co-Financing/Mobilized Finance (CAD$): $104,000,000
Estimated GHG (metric tons of CO₂) Reduction Associated with Project (per year)Disclaimer *: 1,800

Climate Change Resilience in Protected Areas

Canada’s Total Contribution: $990,000

Targeted Countries: Kenya

Funding Period: 2012/2013

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

Canada provided support to build the capacities of protected-areas agencies to enhance resilience to climate change of ecosystems and the restoration of forest and savannah habitats in Kenyan national parks and building an understanding in Canada and internationally of how protected areas are important to helping communities adapt to climate change.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Canada's financial contribution has supported this project in the installation of greenhouses and modernized tree nurseries and to provide plants for restoring forests in Amboseli, Tsavo (East and West) and Aberdare national parks. Communities are engaged in developing and implementing tree nursery and planting programs in Mount Kenya National Park. Invasive species removal is underway in several parks, and work is being completed on an alternative wildlife watering station in Tsavo West to protect Mzima Springs, major drinking water source for downstream communities.

African Adaptation Research Centres Enhancing Climate Change Adaptation Research Capacity in Kenya's Agriculture Sector

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,123,000

Targeted Countries: Kenya

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

This contribution is part of Canada's $10 million Fast-start contribution to the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) to support the African Adaptation Research Centres Initiative. This project worked to enhance agricultural productivity and improve the resilience of agricultural livelihoods in arid and semi-arid lands in Kenya, which are vulnerable to climate change.

Results/Expected Outcomes

With support from Canada’s contribution, the research team has assessed climatic risks and vulnerabilities for communities and agro-systems in three project districts, through downscaling of climate data. They have generated locally relevant data from Global Circulation Models, which is being used to inform adaptation efforts. Results from this assessment indicate that a general increase in rainfall is expected over all of the project sites, with a higher intensity during the March-April-May long rains season. The next step is to determine what shifts in cropping would help farmers adapt to these climatic changes.
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