Ethiopia

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Country Initiatives Details

Canada Fund for African Climate Resilience: Improving Climate Change Resilience in Farmer's Co-operatives

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,808,871

Targeted Countries: Ethiopia

Funding Period: 2012/2013

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

Through the $23.2 million Canada Fund for African Climate Resilience, Canada provided support to activities that aimed at increasing economic, social and ecological resilience of smallholder Ethiopian farmers to climate change.

Results/Expected Outcomes

With support from Canada's contribution, this project is expected to:
    increase collaboration between targeted communities, government, and civil society at regional, zonal, district (worked) and kebele levels to support climate change adaptation
  • increase adoption of climate-resilient gender-responsive food security strategies
  • increase household access to crop and livestock food products

Some key results achieved include:

  • The construction of 6 small scale irrigation schemes has been completed with the active participation of the beneficiary community
  • 36 participants from 17 kebeles received training on community-level animal health management
  • 500 kg of vegetable seeds, 1000 kg of improved varieties of onion seed, 1380 kg of groundnut, 4355 kg of garlic and 1375 kg of a local variety of onion have been purchased and distributed to cooperative members
  • 264 farmers have received training on the preparation and application of compost to their land.

Canada Fund for African Climate Resilience: Bati Adapts to Climate Change Impacts

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,870,071

Targeted Countries: Ethiopia

Funding Period: 2012/2013

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

Through the $23.2 million Canada Fund for African Climate Resilience, Canada provided support to increase the food security of 4,660 households and their ability to adapt to the impacts of climate change in Ethiopia’s Bati district.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Key results achieved to date include:
  • increased institutional capacity of local government in project cycle management related to climate change adaptation
  • increased awareness of the impacts of and relationships between climate change adaptation, natural resource management (NRM), and food security, including risks and vulnerabilities for men and women within the target communities
  • adoption of integrated crop management (climate-responsive) practices by men and women in 12 Kebeles
  • promotion of plant and sustainably managed climate-resilient trees/shrubs/herbs on communal and individual land by men and women in 12 Kebeles (including agro-forestry)
  • adoption of energy efficient and economically sound technologies by men and women in 12 Kebeles.in and outside Kinshasa

Curbing Water Shortage in Ethiopia

Canada’s Total Contribution: $485,000

Targeted Countries: Ethiopia

Funding Period: 2012/2013

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

Canada provided support to the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (INBAR) to support rural communities in Ethiopia with sustainable access to clean water sources through bamboo-based rainwater storage tanks, thereby improving their ability to adapt to water crises and climate change variability.

Results/Expected Outcomes

With support from Canada's contribution, new rainwater storage tanks, made from primarily local materials, have been built. The new tanks will offer an economically viable alternative to rural households that currently rely on un-filtered hand-dug wells and springs shared with livestock for their water supply.

African Adaptation Research Centres: Enhancing Climate Change Adaptation in Agriculture and Water Resources in the Greater Horn of Africa

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,340,000

Targeted Countries: Ethiopia Kenya Sudan Tanzania

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

Flooding and seasonal droughts are undermining the economies and prosperity of countries within the Greater Horn of Africa. Agriculture and water resources are among the key sectors which will be affected most by the impacts of projected climate change. To serve as practical roadmaps for future investments, National Adaptation Programs of Action (NAPAs) need to be strengthened by economic analysis of adaptation investments, and informed by credible and impartial scientific assessment of climate change impacts. This project measured the impacts of climate change on agriculture and water resources, and recommends feasible adaptation options in Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, and Tanzania. Support provided to the Sokoine University of Agriculture of Tanzania is part of Canada's $10 million Fast-start contribution to the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) to support the African Adaptation Research Centres Initiative

Results/Expected Outcomes

With support from Canada's contribution, this project is expected to improve current estimates of adaptation costs and benefits and undertake additional modelling work in specific locations and sectors within each study country. The researchers and postgraduate students involved have been trained in the use of the modelling tools and large-scale assessment methodologies, and a database for large-scale climate change impact assessment is currently being developed. In Kenya, the team is directly involved with all matters related to climate change issues in agriculture and was involved with the development of the National Climate Change Action Plan. In Ethiopia, the project's interim results have been presented at the annual forum of the Research Extension and Farmers Linkage Council (REFLAC), which included participation from key policy-makers. In Sudan, the team has been invited to work as consultants in the development of a US$5.7 million project proposal on “Climate Risk Finance for Sustainable and Climate Resilient Rainfed Farming and Pastoral Systems” to be submitted to Global Environment Facility (GEF) by October 2013.

Managing Environmental Resources to Improve Food Security

Canada’s Total Contribution: $3,000,000

Targeted Countries: Ethiopia

Funding Period: 2009/2010

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

The project supports a food-for-asset-building initiative in 65 chronically food-insecure districts of Ethiopia. This World Food Programme initiative helps communities to invest in sustainable land management, while enhancing their natural resource base. With CIDA support, the project meets the immediate food needs of up to 480,000 chronically food-insecure beneficiaries each year, providing food transfers in return for labour by able-bodied adults. With this community labour, the project aims to rehabilitate up to 60,000 hectares of degraded land per year as well as to develop and maintain other community assets like rural roads and water points. Similar to Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program, households with no able-bodied adults also receive food to meet their needs. In addition, the project introduces improved farming practices and income-generating activities such as fruit production to help beneficiaries become more self-sufficient over time.
http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/cidaweb/cpo.nsf/projen/A034242001

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved as of the end of CIDA's contribution (July 2012) include: 134,911 households (98% of the target) increased their income by taking part in project activities such as keeping bees and selling honey. These activities reduced the number of months with food shortages by at least two months for 100,000 of these households. 98% (147,236) of households participating in food-for work activities created and maintained physical works such as soil and water conservation ditches (also known as bunds) and tree planting, on a self-help basis and continuing a four-year upward trend. In total, over 25,000 hectares of degraded agricultural land were rehabilitated and 20,000 hectares of forest were established. These measures have resulted in reduced soil erosion, increased soil fertility, increased soil moisture, and increased crop yield, all of which contribute to food security.

Managing Environmental Resources for Climate Change Adaptation in Ethiopia

Canada’s Total Contribution: $15,000,000

Targeted Countries: Ethiopia

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

The Managing Environmental Resources to Enable Transition (MERET) program operates in 72 highly vulnerable and chronically food-insecure districts throughout Ethiopia. Each year, approximately 122,000 people in crisis-prone food-insecure communities benefit from the project. Participating households provide labour in exchange for food rations on initiatives such as a tree planting, the construction of structures designed to reduce soil erosion and increase water retention and the enclosure of these treated watersheds to prevent grazing from free-range livestock. A total of 131,987 hectares of severely degraded land was rehabilitated with previous CIDA support in 2008 and 2009. By providing new resources to expand on these impressive results, this project helps more vulnerable Ethiopians achieve long-term food security and withstand the effects of climate change. All CIDA disbursements for this project have been completed.
http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/cidaweb/cpo.nsf/projen/A034242002

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved as of the end of CIDA's contribution (July 2012) include: (1) improving food consumption and increasing household assets for 598,450 people (98% of those targeted) as a result of participation in food-for-work activities; (2) increasing income in 149,122 households as a result of project-supported public works that rehabilitated agricultural lands; 3) 96% of participating households created and maintained physical and biological farm and community assets, such as water sources, resulting in improved income for 145,250 households; (4) restoring degraded natural resources, including improving 63 water sources. These project activities have helped to improve the resilience of vulnerable women and men and their agricultural land to the effects of climate change.

Improving Livelihoods, Agriculture, and National Development

Canada’s Total Contribution: $18,028,000

Targeted Countries: Ethiopia

Funding Period: 2011/2012, 2012/2013, 2013/2014, 2014/2015

Delivery Partner(s):

  • GIZ - German Society for International Cooperation

Description

This project aims to increase agricultural productivity for smallholder farmers in 18 districts in the regions of Amhara, Tigray and Oromia. These districts have high potential for agricultural growth but are increasingly affected by land degradation, food insecurity, and the impacts of climate change. The project is designed to address these issues by supporting the national Sustainable Land Management Program that works with communities and local officials to develop and implement resilience-building plans. These plans focus on reducing land degradation and improving agriculture productivity through increased use of sustainable land management approaches such as rehabilitating degraded watersheds, introducing high value crop varieties, and building terraces and water harvesting systems. Canada’s contribution aims to benefit an estimated 252,000 people in these 18 districts.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved to date include an increase in the use of cut and carry for livestock feeding rather than land-degrading free grazing. In addition 86,790 hectares of land are now under sustainable land management practices, treated with tree planting, gully rehabilitation, terracing, and other measures to improve soil fertility and increase agricultural productivity. Sustainable land management and livelihoods have also contributed to increased agricultural productivity for selected crops such as wheat production.

Linking Initiatives, Stakeholders and Knowledge for Livelihood Security

Canada’s Total Contribution: $3,118,283

Targeted Countries: Bolivia Ethiopia Ghana Mali

Funding Period: 2012/2013, 2013/2014

Delivery Partner(s):

  • CARE Canada

Description

This project focused on food security and nutrition as well as enterprise and economic development. It aimed to improve livelihood security and resilience of 246,216 vulnerable people, with a special emphasis on women and girls.

This project demonstrates Canada’s dedication to climate change action in developing countries. The program worked with government and local NGO partners using a variety of strategies to improve and augment the productive assets they have available to them in an environmentally sustainable way, in order to reduce their vulnerability and increase their ability to cope with inevitable set-backs and shocks.

Results/Expected Outcomes

This program was a multi-country initiative designed to improve the livelihood security and resilience of vulnerable women, girls, men and boys in Bolivia, Ethiopia, Ghana and Mali. Each targeted country implemented its own project, based on the program’s outcomes and existing development plans and/or structures in the targeted regions. In Mali, the Initiative for Food and Nutrition Security in Segou (IFONS) capitalized on the already established relations with community health centres. In Ghana, the Promise project responded directly to one of the national development agenda’s strategy, which calls for promoting economic empowerment of women. In Ethiopia, the Abdishe initiative was specifically designed to provide alternative pathways towards graduation from the Government’s Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP). In Bolivia, Tukuy Yanapana (TY) responded to the identified needs and strategies laid out in CARE Bolivia’s Adaptation to Climate Change and Food Security program. The project is now completed and has achieved or surpassed most of its objectives for food security, nutrition and enterprise development.

Activities in the project’s three African countries emphasized building the capacities and asset-base of smallholder farmers, primarily women farmers, to mitigate climate-change related risks including rainfall variability, increased water scarcity, loss of soil fertility and pests. Through the promotion of climate resilient agriculture techniques and increasing access to productive assets in Mali, Ghana and Ethiopia, a total of 19,565 women and 15,760 men benefited directly from interventions that aimed to increase the resilience of their communities in the face of climate change.

Canadian Urban Institute - International Urban Partnerships Program 2010-2013

Canada’s Total Contribution: $3,568,364

Targeted Countries: Ethiopia Jamaica Philippines

Funding Period: 2009/2010

Delivery Partner(s):

  • Canada Urban Institute

Description

The goal of the Canadian Urban Institute's International Urban Partnerships Program (IUPP) is to advance sustainable economic growth and development in urban regions in developing countries, consistent with the countries' national development agendas. The program aims to improve citizens' quality of life by improving urban management and national and local policies. It contributes to reducing poverty through initiatives that address the environmental and social impacts of rapid urbanisation, while promoting the adoption of good governance practices. The program facilitates the transfer of innovative solutions for urban sustainability between developing countries, at both the institutional and peer levels, thereby strengthening professional relationships that promote learning. This transfer of innovative solutions leads to building a body of knowledge about sustainable economic growth and the development of southern urban regions. Program activities include: strengthening the skills of partners and local stakeholders in growth management, sustainable development, resource leveraging, governance, service delivery, and addressing gender equality; researching, adapting, and promoting methods and tools to address urban issues identified in local strategies and plans; providing technical advice and financial support for pilot initiatives that address priority urban issues.
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Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved at the end of the project include the adoption of 18 new participatory mechanisms in support of long-range planning and implementation of development plans in the parishes of Manchester and St. Elizabeth, Jamaica; neighbourhood upgrading, waterfront planning and downtown revitalization in Addis Ababa and Bahir Dar, Ethiopia; and collaborative action research on the state of Tigum-Aganan watershed and use of a bio-regional approach to disaster risk reduction and management in Metro Iloilo-Guimaras, Philippines. More than 8,500 individuals were directly involved in the project, including 923 individuals (401 female, 522 male) who benefited from coaching/mentoring and capacity building activities organized by the project. They were involved in demonstration projects related to tourism, agribusiness, micro and small enterprise development and downtown revitalization in Jamaica; urban agriculture, solid waste management, cobblestone roads and drainage systems, waterfront regeneration and downtown revitalization in Ethiopia; and ecotourism and sustainable livelihoods in the Philippines. Some of these projects have been scaled up, creating jobs and attracting investments. For example, projects in Jamaica attracted about $1.1 million in investment and created 207 jobs in the two parishes. These results have contributed to increased influence of citizens and communities in local planning and policy making; improved practises and systems of local governments and community organizations in protecting their environment; and increased implementation of sustainable local economic development practices in a manner that enhances the lives of women, men and youth.

Productive Safety Net Program - World Bank

Canada’s Total Contribution: $34,000,000

Targeted Countries: Ethiopia

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

The Productive Safety Net Program is an initiative targeting some of the underlying causes of food insecurity in Ethiopia. Led by the Government of Ethiopia, with the support of CIDA and other donors, the goal of this program is to reduce the vulnerability of chronically food insecure people and enable them to progress towards more resilient livelihoods. The program is designed to provide predictable, multi-year transfers of either food or cash to chronically food insecure people. Food or cash resources are provided to beneficiaries in exchange for their labour on public works projects designed to create productive community assets. These projects include activities such as: terracing and afforestation to improve soil conservation and restore degraded watersheds; water harvesting schemes; small-scale irrigation schemes and the construction of infrastructure such as rural roads, schools and health centres. Food is also provided directly to those beneficiaries who are unable to participate in public works such as orphans, pregnant and lactating women, households with only elderly residents, young children and mothers in female-headed households, and people living with HIV/AIDS.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved by the end of the project (December 2012) include: (i) predictable food or cash transfers provided – either through people’s participation in public works programs or via direct transfers to those unable to work – which have helped reduce the food gap (the gap between people’s need for food and their ability to access it) by an average of 28% for about 3.9 million individuals each year, as well as reduce distress sale of assets; (ii) 3,943 schools and 453 health clinics built, rehabilitated, or repaired, which has improved access to health clinics, primary schools, and other education services for 85% of the households participating in the Productive Safety Net Program; (iii) public works programs in place which created 203,189 ponds for irrigation and livestock water supply, built 522,026 km of anti-erosion embankments to rehabilitate 463,015 hectares of degraded land by closing areas to livestock grazing, planted 1.808 billion trees, and constructed or maintained 106,031km of community roads; (iv) cash transfers provided to beneficiaries; and (v) materials purchased for public works. These activities have had a positive cumulative impact. A 2010 impact assessment determined that, depending on the region, irrigation works have helped between four and twelve percent of households expand their livestock holdings, and beneficiary incomes have increased by four to twenty-five percent. These results have helped people living in chronically food-insecure areas of rural Ethiopia access sufficient, safe and nutritious food.

Productive Safety Net Program - World Food Programme

Canada’s Total Contribution: $93,550,000

Targeted Countries: Ethiopia

Funding Period: 2009/2010, 2011/2012, 2012/2013

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

The Productive Safety Net Program is an initiative targeting some of the underlying causes of food insecurity in Ethiopia. Led by the Government of Ethiopia, with the support of CIDA and other donors, the goal of this program is to reduce the vulnerability of chronically food insecure people and enable them to progress towards more resilient livelihoods. The program is designed to provide predictable, multi-year transfers of either food or cash to chronically food insecure people. Food or cash resources are provided to beneficiaries in exchange for their labour on public works projects designed to create productive community assets. These projects include activities such as: terracing and afforestation to improve soil conservation and restore degraded watersheds; water harvesting schemes; small-scale irrigation schemes and the construction of infrastructure such as rural roads, schools and health centres. Food is also provided directly to those beneficiaries who are unable to participate in public works such as orphans, pregnant and lactating women, households with only elderly residents, young children and mothers in female-headed households, and people living with HIV/AIDS.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved by the end of the project (December 2012) include: (i) predictable food or cash transfers provided – either through people’s participation in public works programs or via direct transfers to those unable to work – which have helped reduce the food gap (the gap between people’s need for food and their ability to access it) by an average of 28% for about 3.9 million individuals each year, as well as reduce distress sale of assets; (ii) 3,943 schools and 453 health clinics built, rehabilitated, or repaired, which has improved access to health clinics, primary schools, and other education services for 85% of the households participating in the Productive Safety Net Program; (iii) public works programs in place which created 203,189 ponds for irrigation and livestock water supply, built 522,026 km of anti-erosion embankments to rehabilitate 463,015 hectares of degraded land by closing areas to livestock grazing, planted 1.808 billion trees, and constructed or maintained 106,031km of community roads; (iv) supporting food procurement and its related delivery and distribution. These activities have had a positive cumulative impact. A 2010 impact assessment determined that, depending on the region, irrigation works have helped between four and twelve percent of households expand their livestock holdings, and beneficiary incomes have increased by four to twenty-five percent. These results have helped people living in chronically food-insecure areas of rural Ethiopia access sufficient, safe and nutritious food.

Food Self-Sufficiency for Farmers

Canada’s Total Contribution: $5,520,289

Targeted Countries: Ethiopia

Funding Period: 2013/2014, 2014/2015

Delivery Partner(s):

  • CARE Canada

Description

This project aims to help 200,000 people feed themselves by increasing their incomes so that they can purchase more food, or by increasing their ability to grow more food. The project targets farm-based families in eight districts in the West and East Hararge and South Gondar zones of rural Ethiopia who are traditionally dependent on food aid for several months a year. The project provides training to help individuals develop the skills needed to increase their agricultural productivity or start small businesses, and to help them secure the necessary loans to fund these initiatives.

This project demonstrates Canada’s dedication to climate change action in developing countries. Project activities support government and community level efforts to address common challenges such as climate change and barriers to gender equality, which are both important factors that prevent families from being able to feed themselves.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved to date include the establishment of 3,591 new Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs) with 61,890 members (39,688 women). These VLSAs began to mobilize savings of CAD $711,298, disbursing CAD $1,336,400 in loans to individuals in the community. Agreements were also signed with three financial service providers who have begun disbursing larger loans totaling CAD $656,246 for VSLA members to invest in new income generating activities to diversify their livelihoods, in which female-headed households were receiving just over half of these loans.

In terms of climate change adaptation, the project made VSLA members significantly more resilient in coping with the impacts of Ethiopia’s severe drought by using improved farming inputs (seeds) and techniques. In addition, 11 government institutions are mainstreaming gender-responsive disaster risk management and climate change adaptation into their local development plans, and plan to mainstream this in their government activities and budgets for the coming year. The project also continues to work on strengthening links with early warning systems for disaster risk management.

Climate Resilience and Co-operatives in Ethiopia

Canada’s Total Contribution: $18,462

Targeted Countries: Ethiopia

Funding Period: 2013/2014

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

This project aims to increase economic, social, and ecological resilience to climate variability of 12,000 resource-poor farming households in the Woreda district of Fogera in the Amhara Regional State of Ethiopia. Food and nutrition security of beneficiaries will be increased by promoting diversified and integrated crop and livestock production systems, increasing soil fertility and making better use of available water. The sustainable management of natural resources in the wider catchment area will be improved by restoring private and community-owned forests and grasslands through effective, affordable and replicable solutions. The project also aims to strengthen local stakeholders’ capacity to negotiate and jointly implement actions, in order to restore and enhance selected natural capital assets through a collaborative landscape approach.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The expected intermediate outcomes for this project include increasing the quality of crops for consumption and sale among 6000 farming households composed of women and men; engaging in diversified and sustainable economic activities leading to increased incomes for women and men; and ensuring the sustainable management of natural resources among women and men farmers and communities.

Results achieved to date include 47 farmers adopting the new technology, such as minimum tillage, to improve soil conditions. This was demonstrated to over 2,600 other farmers and government officials, supporting an increase by 67% in maize production. In addition, as part of the project, 138,208 seedlings were raised and distributed to 633 households. These seedlings were planted in the watersheds of the project area which improved the vegetation in the area, and makes it more resilient to climate change.

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