Bolivia

Map of Bolivia

Country Initiatives Details

Strengthening Local Capacity for Adaptation to Climate Change in the Bolivian Altiplano

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,077,600

Targeted Countries: Bolivia

Funding Period: 2011/2012

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

This contribution is part of Canada's $20 million fast-start contribution to the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) to support climate change adaptation projects in the water sector in Asia and in Latin America and the Caribbean. This project provided support for the development of downscaled climate scenarios for the Altiplano region of Bolivia to provide evidence of climate change impacts on water systems and to inform adaptation plans.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The project is making projections for future changes in precipitation, evaporation, and water flows from Lake Titicaca, the main water reservoir in the Altiplano. Initial vulnerability maps have been developed and high resolution land cover analysis has been completed. The project team has successfully made alliances with several regional institutions involved in water regulation and management, including the region's association of local water providers. The government of the province of Oruro has expressed an interest in pioneering adaptation plans and has endorsed the project. It is expected that the research will guide the provincial government's investments, including the allocation of finance from potential international adaptation funds.

Community-based Ecodevelopment and Environmental Health

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,863,899

Targeted Countries: Bolivia

Funding Period: 2009/2010, 2010/2011, 2011/2012, 2012/2013, 2013/2014

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

The project aims to strengthen three universities in the Bolivian Amazonia in training, research, and service to communities to promote community-based ecodevelopment and environmental health in connection with water and sanitation. Through this project, Université du Québec à Montréal aims to strengthen the Universidad Autónoma Gabriel René Moreno, the Universidad Amazónica de Pando, and the Universidad Técnica del Beni Mariscal José Ballivián through professional development of academic teams. The project also supports the creation of a training program for leaders in community-based ecodevelopment and environmental health. Finally, the project promotes the development of, or support for, ecodevelopment projects in this area among women, Aboriginal people, and street youth.
http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/cidaweb/cpo.nsf/projen/S063421001

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results obtained as of the end of the project include: (i) Through its collaborative approach, the project strengthened cultural identity among the 168 eco-leaders in 13 communities targeted by the project; (ii) 72 community projects were designed, including 28 that received funding from the municipalities (e.g. environmentally sustainable family gardens, waste management, establishment of a municipal landfill, reforestation, the greening of schools, community production of sugar, communal fish farms, an ecological park, a seed bank); (iii) Three educational resource centres were established, one in each of the participating universities. These results are contributing to increased capacities of the three university partners in the Bolivian Amazon for training, research, and community outreach in the areas of community-based eco-development and environmental health related to water and nutrition.

Linking Initiatives, Stakeholders and Knowledge for Livelihood Security

Canada’s Total Contribution: $3,118,283

Targeted Countries: Bolivia Ethiopia Ghana Mali

Funding Period: 2012/2013, 2013/2014

Delivery Partner(s):

  • CARE Canada

Description

This project focused on food security and nutrition as well as enterprise and economic development. It aimed to improve livelihood security and resilience of 246,216 vulnerable people, with a special emphasis on women and girls.

This project demonstrates Canada’s dedication to climate change action in developing countries. The program worked with government and local NGO partners using a variety of strategies to improve and augment the productive assets they have available to them in an environmentally sustainable way, in order to reduce their vulnerability and increase their ability to cope with inevitable set-backs and shocks.

Results/Expected Outcomes

This program was a multi-country initiative designed to improve the livelihood security and resilience of vulnerable women, girls, men and boys in Bolivia, Ethiopia, Ghana and Mali. Each targeted country implemented its own project, based on the program’s outcomes and existing development plans and/or structures in the targeted regions. In Mali, the Initiative for Food and Nutrition Security in Segou (IFONS) capitalized on the already established relations with community health centres. In Ghana, the Promise project responded directly to one of the national development agenda’s strategy, which calls for promoting economic empowerment of women. In Ethiopia, the Abdishe initiative was specifically designed to provide alternative pathways towards graduation from the Government’s Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP). In Bolivia, Tukuy Yanapana (TY) responded to the identified needs and strategies laid out in CARE Bolivia’s Adaptation to Climate Change and Food Security program. The project is now completed and has achieved or surpassed most of its objectives for food security, nutrition and enterprise development.

Activities in the project’s three African countries emphasized building the capacities and asset-base of smallholder farmers, primarily women farmers, to mitigate climate-change related risks including rainfall variability, increased water scarcity, loss of soil fertility and pests. Through the promotion of climate resilient agriculture techniques and increasing access to productive assets in Mali, Ghana and Ethiopia, a total of 19,565 women and 15,760 men benefited directly from interventions that aimed to increase the resilience of their communities in the face of climate change.

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