Global initiatives

Details

Advisory Services: Sustainable Energy Financing in the Middle East and North Africa

Canada’s Total Contribution: $455,000

Targeted Region: Multiple

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Project Funded through a Canadian Facility: IFC - Canada Climate Change Program (CCCP)

Delivery Channel:

Description

The IFC-Canada Climate Change Program financed advisory services to catalyze energy efficiency and renewable energy investments through local financial intermediaries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. MENA is the second most energy intensive region globally, which undermines the competitiveness of the region’s enterprises, more so in a situation of scarce resources and growing electricity tariffs. The advisory services will build financial intermediaries’ capacity to assess, screen and appraise private sector clients seeking sustainable energy financing.

Results/Expected Outcomes

This project has been completed. Results achieved included providing tailored advisory support to 5 clients in Jordan and Lebanon, including a local bank which received a credit line supported by the program. 15 training sessions, seminars, and workshops were conducted for 383 participants with satisfactory feedback from clients. The program also developed 18 reports (assessments, surveys, manuals etc.) that facilitated the disbursement of 350 loans. In addition, the successful testing of market potential in Lebanon and Jordan led to another sustainable energy finance program in Pakistan, Egypt, Tunisia, and Morocco.
Additional Finance Mobilized ($CAD): $1,495,000
Estimated GHG (metric tons of CO₂) Reduction Associated with Project (per year)Disclaimer *: 13,900

African Water Facility – Phase II

Canada’s Total Contribution: $30,032,000

Targeted Region: Africa

Funding Period: 2011/2012, 2013/2014, 2014/2015

Delivery Channel:

Description

This project aims to enhance the equitable sustainable development and management of African water resources, in order to promote poverty alleviation, socio-economic development, regional cooperation, the environment, and resilience to water-related disasters and climate change. This will involve providing support for the preparation of 'bankable' water infrastructure projects in Africa, which have gone through high-quality project preparation processes to ensure environmental, economic, and legal viability. This project also aims to: contribute to sustainable economic growth in Africa by helping to establish water infrastructure; strengthen institutional platforms for trans-boundary water resource governance and management; improve evidence-based decision-making capabilities; and provide small-scale strategic water infrastructure investments in fragile and post-conflict states. This contribution includes funds set aside for advisory services.

This project demonstrates Canada’s dedication to climate change action in developing countries. The African Water Facility (AWF) prioritizes projects that feature water harvesting, conservation, storage, recycling and re-use, and the use of renewable energy to power water stations and infrastructure.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved by the African Water Facility (AWF) to date include 6.3 million people that gained access to improved sanitation and about 5.6 million people that were provided access to improved drinking water sources since 2006. 11 countries have also put in place a more enabling investment environment for the water sector through the preparation and implementation of Integrated Water Resource Management plans, while 10 regions or transboundary basins have put in place a more effective Trans-boundary Water Resource Management environment, facilitating the preparation and financing of regional infrastructure investment projects.

Agricultural Micro-Insurance in the Caribbean

Canada’s Total Contribution: $900,000

Targeted Region: West Indies

Funding Period: 2012/2013

Delivery Channel:

Description

The project aims to develop agricultural insurance as a cost effective mechanism to protect the livelihoods of low-income farmers in the Caribbean. The project starts by providing insurance cover to banana farmers in the Eastern Caribbean. As the project progresses, it aims to expand its coverage from 3,000 farmers to 15,000, reaching about 50,000 beneficiaries, supporting more countries in the region, as well as more crops, including nutmeg, cocoa, coffee and rice. The project also assists farmers to implement disaster risk reduction techniques. The project is implemented in collaboration with the Caribbean Development Bank and the Government of United Kingdom’s Department for International Development.
http://www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/cidaweb/cpo.nsf/projen/A035492001

Results/Expected Outcomes

The expected intermediate outcomes for this project include: (1) Enhanced equitable delivery of insurance products to women and men farmers in the Caribbean; (2) Improved reinsurance mechanisms available in the Caribbean.

BioCarbon Plus Fund

Canada’s Total Contribution: $4,500,000

Targeted Region: Developing Countries

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada provided support to the World Bank BioCarbon Fund, to support building capacity and demonstrating projects to effectively sequester and conserve carbon in forest and agriculture. More specifically, activities were aimed to build capacity to facilitate and develop projects that contribute to reduced greenhouse gas emissions, improved quality of life for local communities and strengthened poverty alleviation efforts.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Since Canada's fast-start financing contribution to the fund, the BioCarbon Plus Fund has achieved several results. These important developments will support climate change efforts in the forestry and agricultural sectors: the development of tools to improve the monitoring of afforestation and reforestation projects; the delivery of a workshop for African agriculture negotiators interested in promoting eligible land-use activities; and, the publication of documented lessons learned from past projects.

Building Climate Finance Tracking Capacities in Developing Countries

Canada’s Total Contribution: $145,000

Targeted Region: Africa and South America and the Caribbean

Funding Period: 2012/2013

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada provided support to the World Resources Institute to build on the capacity of developing countries to track the volume and results of climate financing they receive.

Results/Expected Outcomes

With support from Canada's contribution, two workshops were conducted; one in Kenya and one in Colombia. A key product of this study is the Initial Good Practice Guidance that aims to help developing countries improve their systems, processes and institutional arrangements for monitoring climate finance. It provides considerable flexibility to countries to integrate the monitoring of climate finance with existing financial management procedures and systems or, and as appropriate, to tailor made systems and procedures to fit their situations.

Canada Fund for the Private Sector in the Americas at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $250,000,000

Targeted Region: Latin America and the Caribbean

Funding Period: 2011/2012, 2012/2013

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada provided $250 million to the Inter-American Development Bank to create the Canada Fund for the Private Sector in the Americas (C2F), which provides financial support to select private sector projects. These projects may include: renewable energy; energy efficiency; greenhouse gas emission reduction and abatement projects, including forestry; agriculture and land-use changes; as well as projects associated with adapting to climate change vulnerabilities.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Canadian Climate Fund for the Private Sector in Asia

Canada’s Total Contribution: $82,390,000

Targeted Region: Asia - Low, lower-middle income and small island developing countries

Funding Period: 2012/2013

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada provided a $82.39 million contribution to the Asian Development Bank, including $75 million of concessional financing to support catalyzing private investment in climate change in low and lower-middle income countries and small island developing states in Asia, and $7.39 million of grant financing to provide technical assistance to select private sector projects or public sector projects that can improve the enabling environment for private sector investments in clean energy and adaptation.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Canada’s contribution is aiming to enhance the Asian Development Bank's (ADB) capacity to mobilize private finance to address climate change. Projects funded will focus primarily on renewable energy, energy efficiency, urban infrastructure and sustainable transportation projects, greenhouse gas emission reduction and abatement projects, as well as projects associated with adapting to climate change vulnerabilities. Overall, the expected outcomes for this fund are to increase implementation of climate change mitigation measures and reduce vulnerability to the adverse effects of climate change.

To date, support for mitigation action through this fund has supported 1.8 million metric tons of CO2 emission reductions per year, 3.3 terawatt hours (TWh) of renewable energy generation a year; and 664 megawatts (MW) of installed renewable energy capacity.

Through support to projects targeting adaptation action this fund has supported 315,000 farmers gain access to improved information for climate resilient choice in agriculture, 3,000 communities develop and implement strategies for conservation and sustainable management; 500 communities improve disaster risk management plans or infrastructure; and 6,500 hectares of land go under climate resilient conservation, rehabilitation or sustainable management.

Canadian Climate Fund for the Private Sector in Asia – Phase II

Canada’s Total Contribution: $148,500,000

Targeted Region: Asia - Low, lower-middle income and small island developing countries

Funding Period: 2016/2017

Delivery Channel:

Description

As part of its $2.65 billion climate finance commitment, Canada is providing $200 million over 2016/17 to 2019/20, for the second phase of the Canadian Climate Fund for the Private Sector in Asia (CFPS II). This fund aims to catalyze private investment in climate change action in developing countries, including small-island developing states. Using concessional financing, this fund enables private investment in climate change projects that would not otherwise happen due to market barriers to investment.
In 2016/17 Canada delivered $148.5 million to the Asian Development Bank. The remaining funds will be delivered in the next two years. More information on the fund and Canada’s partnership with the Asian Development Bank can be found here: https://www.adb.org/site/funds/funds/canadian-climate-fund-for-the-private-sector-in-asia-2

Results/Expected Outcomes

Overall, the expected outcomes for this fund are to increase implementation of climate change mitigation measures and reduce vulnerability to the adverse effects of climate change in the Asia-Pacific region. Canada’s contribution will also create jobs, with a focus on enhancing the economic participation of women in climate action. Projects funded will support a range of climate action activities, including: renewable energy, energy efficiency, sustainable transport, waste and wastewater management, agriculture and forestry, and coastal protection.

Capacity Building Initiative for Transparency (CBIT)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $5,000,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2016/2017, 2017/2018

Delivery Channel:

Description

As part of Canada’s $2.65 billion climate finance commitment, Canada is providing $5 million over 2016/17 to 2017/18, to the Global Environment Facility, for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Capacity Building Initiative for Transparency (CBIT). CBIT was established at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) in order to help developing countries increase their capacity to report transparently their greenhouse gas emissions reductions and their climate efforts, in line with the enhanced transparency requirements laid out in the Paris Agreement. The CBIT focuses especially on strengthening the institutional and technical capacities of developing countries and is established under the Global Environment Facility. So far, ten national projects have been approved in Costa Rica, Kenya, South Africa, Cambodia, Chile, Ghana, Mongolia, Papua New Guinea, Uganda and Uruguay, as well as a Global Coordination Project led by the United Nations Development Programme and the United Nations Environment Programme.

Results/Expected Outcomes

While the 10 national projects respond to nationally identified priorities, and are thus specific to each country’s transparency-related capacity-building needs, they all seek to enhance coordination at the national level, improve or further develop national frameworks for Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV), and strengthen the institutional capacity for transparency-related activities. All projects have components related to improving GHG inventories and transparency of mitigation actions. Some projects also include transparency of adaptation actions and of support needed and received. The Global Coordination Project aims to create a platform to enable coordination, maximize learning opportunities and foster knowledge-sharing to facilitate transparency enhancements for all interested countries. The project will also provide a platform to help coordinate with other existing transparency- related initiatives, such as the Initiative for Climate Action Transparency (ICAT), the Partnership on Transparency in the Paris Agreement, and the NDC Partnership and work led by the UNFCCC.

Caribbean Disaster Risk Management Program

Canada’s Total Contribution: $4,498,060

Targeted Region: West Indies

Funding Period: 2009/2010, 2010/2011, 2011/2012, 2012/2013, 2013/2014, 2014/2015

Delivery Channel:

Description

This project aims to improve the ability of the Caribbean region to prepare for and respond to natural disasters, such as hurricanes and floods, and reduce their impact on people. It supports the implementation of the disaster risk management framework adopted by the member states of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM).

This project demonstrates Canada’s dedication to climate change action in developing countries. Key activities involve a responsive fund that supports initiatives led by organizations such as the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency. These initiatives improve coordination and disaster preparedness at local, national, and regional levels and encourage the integration of disaster risk management into policies, planning, and decision-making in the public and private sectors. The project also supports the Canada Caribbean Disaster Risk Management Fund, a local fund that provides assistance to non-governmental organizations, community groups, and government agencies undertaking small-scale projects at the community level.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved to date include the institutionalization, harmonization, and strengthening of Comprehensive Disaster Management (CDM) work programmes, policies and/or strategies, and draft national legislation in multiple Caribbean countries. There was also a strengthening of the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency Co-ordinating Unit; the creation of a regional CDM Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting framework; the securing of funding for implementation of various elements of work programmes in multiple countries; and the development of improved disaster preparedness and management in 25 communities.

Since its inception in 2008, the Canada Caribbean Disaster Risk Management Fund has supported 28 sub-projects in 13 countries. These sub-projects have helped to increase community capacity to mitigate natural hazard and climate change risks by helping to retrofit community buildings for use as shelters, support land stabilization efforts, and design and implement effective early warning, emergency communication and water harvesting systems. These results have contributed to reducing exposure to climate change disaster risk in the participating Caribbean countries.

Catalyst Fund

Canada’s Total Contribution: $75,000,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2012/2013

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada provided support to the International Finance Corporation (IFC) Catalyst fund which aimed to encourage climate financing in emerging markets through climate-focused equity funds. The Catalyst Fund invests in venture capital and private equity in developing countries on a commercial basis, with a focus on sectors where there are opportunities to promote efficient use of resources as a way to mitigate and adapt to climate change.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The IFC Catalyst Fund made its first financial commitment: $20M for an investment in the Armstrong South East Asia Clean Energy Fund, combined with $110M from a variety of public and private investors. The Armstrong Fund is a private equity fund that focusses on providing development capital to smaller-scale renewable energy and resource efficiency projects in Southeast Asia’s emerging markets. Over its expected 10-year lifespan, the Armstrong Fund expects to make between 10 and 15 investments, each ranging from US$5 million to US$12 million. Projects of a typical size would generate up to 10 MW from renewable energy resources of solar, hydro, wind or biogas.

CGIAR Wheat Initiative

Canada’s Total Contribution: $3,000,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2013/2014

Delivery Channel:

Description

This project supports the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) Research Program on Wheat to improve the nutrition of poor and vulnerable groups in developing countries. Given that over 55% of the world’s poor rely on wheat for food and livelihoods, increasing yields and thereby reducing the volatility of prices, is key to ensure that people have access to adequate nutrition.

This project demonstrates Canada’s dedication to climate change action in developing countries. CGIAR develops improved, high-yield seed varieties that are resistant to disease and drought, and better crop management practices to adapt to and reduce the effects of climate change.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved to date include helping to more than double Ethiopia’s wheat production in a decade through improved disease resistant wheat varieties. In addition, public and private partners in South Asia released the first wave of wheat varieties with higher concentrations of zinc to combat malnutrition, which was adopted by 250,000 farmers in India. Wheat lines have also been tested in multiple environments that combined two key genes for disease resistance, in collaboration with scientists from Canada and with wheat lines from the Swift Current Research and Development Centre.

Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) Trust Fund

Canada’s Total Contribution: $6,000,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2016/2017, 2017/2018

Delivery Channel:

Description

As part of Canada’s $2.65 billion climate finance commitment, Canada is providing $10 million to the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) over 2016/17 to 2020/21, to reduce the emissions of short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs), including black carbon, methane, and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). Reducing emissions of SLCPs is critical to meet the goal set out in the Paris Agreement to avoid dangerous climate change by limiting global warming to well below 2°C while striving towards 1.5°C. The CCAC is the first global framework dedicated to protecting the climate and improving air quality through actions to reduce SLCPs, which contribute to climate change and are also dangerous air pollutants. Funding to the CCAC supports concrete, action-oriented initiatives to promote the near-term reduction of SLCPs in various sectors, with the engagement of high-level stakeholders. This work can help address near-term climate change effects, and substantially reduce the health impacts of SLCPs emissions in developing countries. This contribution builds on Canada previous $13 million contribution to the CCAC Trust Fund. As a top donor to the Trust Fund, Canada has supported the development and implementation of the CCAC’s initiatives across key sectors in developing countries.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The CCAC is committed to addressing the air quality and climate change impacts from SLCPs simultaneously. Due to its efforts, and Canada’s contribution, SLCPs have gained significant traction on regional and global climate and health agendas. Canada’s contribution supports CCAC initiatives to mitigate emissions from landfills and municipal solid waste, reduce black carbon emissions from heavy duty diesel vehicles, and promote HFC alternative technology and new, cleaner standards for cooling technology in developing countries, among other areas of work. For instance, in September 2017, the CCAC launched the Global Industry Partnership on Soot-Free Clean Bus Fleets. Four of the world’s largest bus and engine manufacturers (Build Your Dreams, Cummins, Scania, and Volvo) committed to this partnership to work with 20 megacities and the CCAC to promote, facilitate and adopt clean bus technology to reduce harmful SLCPs emissions from buses and help combat climate change.

Climate Change Adaptation in Africa (CCAA)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $6,125,208

Targeted Region: Africa

Funding Period: 2009/2010, 2010/2011, 2011/2012, 2012/2013, 2013/2014

Delivery Channel:

  • International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

Description

By fostering research and capacity building, and a culture of knowledge sharing among researchers and those affected by climate change, the Climate Change Adaptation (CCAA) program, which ran from 2006-2012, contributed to a growing body of expertise that will benefit those most vulnerable. The program was jointly delivered by the IDRC and the UK Department for International Development and supported 41 research projects in 33 countries.

These included two initiatives that continue after the end of the program: the African Climate Change Fellowship Program (ACCFP), which provides scholarships for the pursuit of advanced research on climate change adaptation, and AfricaAdapt, a multi-media platform that links researchers, development organizations, donors and others with a stake in African adaptation. Further, as part of the evolution of CCAA, a research-to-policy platform called Africa Interact was set up and funded by IDRC.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The Climate Change Adaptation in Africa (CCAA) project made a lasting contribution to Africa’s capacity to adapt to climate change by nurturing a strong cadre of researchers and institutions.

By engaging directly with vulnerable communities, the research supported by CCAA contributed a clearer understanding of vulnerability, new respect for traditional knowledge, and field-tested adaptation solutions. Projects also involved policymakers in the research process, which led to greater understanding of policy processes, enhanced policy dialogue and coordination and, in a number of cases, uptake of research in adaptation plans.

Key results achieved as of the end of the project (March 2012): (i) More than 200 African organizations carried out research on climate change adaptation as lead, collaborating, or participating institutions; (ii) 68 scholars and professionals deepened their expertise through the African Climate Change Fellowships Program; and, (iii) 11 people associated with CCAA worked on the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

For more details on the results, consult the program’s final report.

Climate Change and Water (CCW)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $18,646,253

Targeted Region: Multiple

Funding Period: 2009/2010, 2010/2011, 2011/2012, 2012/2013, 2013/2014

Delivery Channel:

  • International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

Description

The Climate Change and Water Program (CCW) supports applied multidisciplinary research to improve adaptation efforts to the water-related impacts of climate change. The CCW program, which runs from 2010-2015, supports research institutions in developing countries advance knowledge about the water-related impacts of climate change, identify a range of options and strategies for coping with such impacts, and generate evidence that can be used to inform adaptation policy and practice.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The Climate Change and Water (CCW) program has supported more than 78 projects in 50 countries across Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. Expected outcomes include: cases of national or municipal policy change are affected or informed by the program’s research, improvements in access to water are evident as a result of CCW policies, and improvements in capacity to adapt to climate change and a reduction in vulnerability to water stress at multiple scales – from small communities to larger sub-regions containing a large population.

Climate change programming within the Ecosystems and Human Health (Ecohealth) program

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,131,583

Targeted Region: Africa and the Americas

Funding Period: 2013/2014

Delivery Channel:

  • International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

Description

The Ecosystems and Human Health (Ecohealth) program supports researchers in developing countries to produce evidence and policies for improving public health and fostering healthier and ecologically sound development. A subset of the program's portfolio aims to increase understanding of the health risks pertaining to climate change, and to identify adaptation options for increasing the health and resilience of people and ecosystems.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The Ecohealth program has funded projects across Africa addressing the vulnerability of populations to climate change. These projects strengthened research capacity in Africa and led to better understanding of the high vulnerability of poor population groups. Ongoing projects in Colombia and Bolivia are looking into health impacts for populations living in two Inter-Andean Valleys, which are characterized by fragile ecosystems and changing water availability and quality as a result of climate change.

Some of the research findings are informing national health control programs and enhancing the capacity of local communities to manage issues under study. For example, one project successfully uncovered ways in which local farming and irrigation practices influenced the transmission of Leishmaniasis, a vector-borne disease, and produced new evidence on climatic drivers influencing outbreaks of the disease. A risk model was developed to guide prevention and control, laying the groundwork for disease surveillance and development of an early warning system.

Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security Challenge Program - 2010

Canada’s Total Contribution: $5,500,000

Targeted Region: Multiple

Funding Period: 2009/2010

Delivery Channel:

Description

As part of Canada’s 2009 G8 commitment to the L’Aquila Food Security Initiative, Canada supports the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS). CCAFS, led by the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) located in Colombia, seeks to support agriculture in the context of climate variability, climate change and uncertainty about future climate conditions. Key activities include the development and evaluation of options for adapting to a changing climate to inform agriculture development, food security policy and donor investment strategies; and assisting farmers, policy makers, researchers and donors to monitor, assess and adjust their actions in response to a changing climate. CCAFS works with a wide range of partners at the local, regional and global levels. Canada’s support to CCAFS contributes to finding solutions to threats to food security posed by a changing climate.
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Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved by the Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security Challenge Program, with the support of CIDA and other donors include: the analysis of climate finance options for smallholder farmers to engage them in climate mitigation activities; the development of strategies to address future climate stresses for four target crops (sorghum, rice, beans and bananas); the testing of farm management options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions for grasses, rice, soil management, agroforestry and fruit trees.

Climate Risk Early Warning Systems (CREWS)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,618,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2016/2017, 2017/2018

Delivery Channel:

Description

As part of Canada’s $2.65 billion climate finance commitment, Canada is providing $10 million, over 2016/17 to 2020/21, for the Climate Risk & Early Warning Systems (CREWS) to improve Multi-Hazard Early Warning Systems in developing countries, particularly the Small Island Developing States and Least Developed Countries. These systems have been proven to reduce loss of life and economic hardship caused by meteorological hazards such as tropical cyclones, floods, severe storms, forest fires, and heat waves. The CREWS initiative was developed to support Least Developed Countries and Small Island Developing States in significantly increasing the delivery of weather and climate services and the capacity to generate and communicate effective, impacted multi-hazard, gender-informed, early warnings systems to protect lives, livelihoods, and assets. CREWS focuses on ensuring that early warnings, related both to the weather and climate events, are risk informed, reaching the people and institutions that need them and sufficiently informing them of to how to react. Canada’s contribution will support the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in activities such as the Severe Weather Forecasting Demonstration Project and the Flash Flood Guidance System in support of wider WMO strategic objectives on disaster risk reduction and service delivery.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The project is expected to develop and deliver education and training packages for multiple countries, and provide regional and in-country technical assistance to the National Meteorological and Hydrological Services (NMHSs) to develop and deliver impact-based warnings, products and services. It will also strengthen governance arrangements and coordination/communication mechanisms within and among the participating NMHSs and stakeholders in all sectors. It is expected to contribute towards the reviewing of capabilities, gaps and needs in relation to risk analysis and forecasting tools for severe weather, flash/riverine floods and drought.

Climate Risk Management Pilot

Canada’s Total Contribution: $500,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Project Funded through a Canadian Facility: IFC - Canada Climate Change Program (CCCP)

Delivery Channel:

Description

The IFC-Canada Climate Change Program provided support for the development of tools to manage climate risks in climate sensitive sectors. Tools will include a screening process for new investments and their categorization according to level of climate risk, “sectoral manuals” that compile sectoral climate change related risks and mitigation measures, and climate change information specific to a set of pilot countries or regions.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Following a competitive procurement process, consultants have been selected for the targeted sectors of ports and harbors, insurance, and forestry, pulp and paper. The consultancies have developed planned interim deliverables, including material climate indices for each sector. Based on this, a climate research institution was contracted to elaborate values for the indices. With support from Canada, this project is expected to mobilize an additional $500,000 in co-financing from public and private sources.
Additional Finance Mobilized ($CAD): $500,000

Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia (CARIAA)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,910,379

Targeted Region: Multiple

Funding Period: 2012/2013, 2013/2014

Delivery Channel:

  • International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

Description

The Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia (CARIAA) program supports high-calibre research and policy engagement in Africa and Asia by focusing on three climate change hot spots: semi-arid regions, deltas, and glacier- and snow-fed basins. Each hot spot is home to large numbers of poor people whose livelihoods depend on climate sensitive sectors.

Using these hot spots as a lens for research on common challenges across different contexts, new opportunities and insights can emerge. CARIAA brings together consortia of up to five institutions with a range of regional, scientific and socio-economic development expertise to explore the physical, social, economic, and political dimensions of vulnerability and adaptation options. The consortia also tackle climate change over different timeframes and across different scales—from impacts on households and villages, up to regional and global policies.

CARIAA is jointly delivered by IDRC and the Department for International Development (DFID) in the UK, running from 2012 to 2019.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The Collaborative Adaptation research Initiative in Africa and Asia (CARIAA) program will inform adaptation plans and policies on a range of scales, from local to regional, and over a variety of time frames. Working with local stakeholders and decision-makers, the research teams will produce simulations showing possible migration and land use changes that may result from climate change, and the various adaptation choices for affected populations. These simulations will reflect the different effects climate change may have on men and women, and the different options they have for coping. While building networks of expertise, this research will help policymakers better understand the likely impacts that climate change will have on migration in these regions and the options available to affected populations.

Community Disaster Risk Reduction Program

Canada’s Total Contribution: $17,500,000

Targeted Region: West Indies

Funding Period: 2011/2012, 2012/2013, 2013/2014, 2014/2015

Delivery Channel:

Description

This project supports community resilience in the face of natural disasters by undertaking demonstration projects that help determine which prevention or mitigation measures are most effective. Demonstration projects will be implemented in fifteen to seventeen communities across the Caribbean, with a focus on high-risk, low-income communities. These projects will build on lessons learned from other disaster risk reduction projects and test innovative ideas to expand or improve on them, in order to produce tangible risk reduction results in pilot communities that can be disseminated across the region. The projects will also address knowledge gaps in the region by establishing a mechanism to improve the tracking of disaster risk management lessons learned, and measuring results.

The Caribbean Development Bank will also use regional specialists to train and inform government agencies, local officials, community workers and community-based organizations on the resources and approaches available for reducing natural hazard impacts at the community level.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Canada's contribution is expected to reduce natural hazard risks and climate change impacts in up to 17 communities in the Caribbean region, through gender-responsive and environmentally sustainable community level interventions.

Disaster Risk Management - Health Sector

Canada’s Total Contribution: $2,050,000

Targeted Region: West Indies

Funding Period: 2009/2010, 2010/2011, 2011/2012, 2012/2013, 2014/2015

Delivery Channel:

Description

This project aimed to increase the capacity of national governments and local communities in the Caribbean to respond to and manage natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods, and to reduce their impact on the people of the region. Specifically, the project sought to improve disaster preparedness within health sector institutions in the Caribbean and promote the integration of health-related disaster risk management into policies, laws, and decision-making at the national level. This project was a component of the Disaster Risk Management Program.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved as of the end of this project include the development of a health sector disaster risk management assessment tool, which was applied in 16 countries, allowing these countries to have a comprehensive picture of the state of disaster risk reduction in their health sector. In addition, 12 sub-plans for the national health sector disaster plan were developed, as well the first module of a Health Sector Disaster Risk Reduction information system to facilitate, monitoring, evaluation and reporting on safe hospitals. Training was also undertaken for health and related staff to manage mental health and psycho-social issues in disasters, mass casualty management, and safe hospital evaluators. Other results associated with the project include the assessment of the safety of one or more hospital in 14 countries, with 40 facilities assessed; the implementation of safety improvements in 16 hospitals; and the preparation of a number of technical resources to provide guidance for mainstreaming disaster risk in the health sector.

Energy & Resource Efficiency Solutions in Africa

Canada’s Total Contribution: $300,000

Targeted Region: Africa

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Project Funded through a Canadian Facility: IFC - Canada Climate Change Program (CCCP)

Delivery Channel:

Description

The IFC-Canada Climate Change Program provided support for this regional project to catalyze the uptake and use of resource efficiency and clean energy solutions in Sub-Saharan Africa. The projects aims to help reduce the use of energy, water and other resources thereby increasing the competitiveness and performance of companies in the manufacturing, agribusiness and services sectors. The project will provide tailored advice and solutions for individual companies, as well as groups of firms and industries in Africa, and will provide sector-level input and recommendations for policy makers.

Results/Expected Outcomes

With support from Canada, this project is expected to mobilize an additional $2.1 million in co-financing from public and private sources and lead to an estimated greenhouse gas emissions reduction of 30,000 metric tons of CO2 per year.* The project will work with clients in Nigeria, Kenya, Zambia, Tanzania, Senegal, Mozambique, Ethiopia and South Africa.
Additional Finance Mobilized ($CAD): $2,100,000
Estimated GHG (metric tons of CO₂) Reduction Associated with Project (per year)Disclaimer *: 30,000

Energy & Water Solutions for Corporates in Europe and Central Asia

Canada’s Total Contribution: $220,000

Targeted Region: Multiple

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Project Funded through a Canadian Facility: IFC - Canada Climate Change Program (CCCP)

Delivery Channel:

Description

The IFC-Canada Climate Change Program is providing financing for this project, with the objective to catalyze uptake and increase investment in energy and water efficient solutions so that companies and municipalities in Europe and Central Asia (ECA) can become more productive and competitive. This project will deliver advisory services on energy and resource efficiency to 18–20 corporate or municipal clients during three years.

Results/Expected Outcomes

This project is expected to mobilize an additional $4.15 million in co-financing from public and private sources, facilitating an additional US$90 million of investment in resource efficiency improvements. In addition the project aims to save 220,000 megawatt hours (MWh) of energy and 1.4 million m3 of water use annually, which will lead to an estimated greenhouse gas emissions reduction of 100,000 metric tons of CO2 per year.*
Additional Finance Mobilized ($CAD): $4,150,000
Estimated GHG (metric tons of CO₂) Reduction Associated with Project (per year)Disclaimer *: 100,000

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $40,000,000

Targeted Region: Developing Countries

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Delivery Channel:

Description

The Forest Carbon Partnership Facility’s (FCPF) Readiness Fund is a World Bank-managed global partnership that assists developing countries in tropical and sub-tropical regions in their efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. It promotes forest conservation, sustainable management of forests and the enhancement of forest carbon stocks (amount of carbon stored in forest ecosystems).

Results/Expected Outcomes

The Forest Carbon Partnership Facility’s (FCPF) provides technical and financial assistance to 36 Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) country participants. As of March 2013, 20 Readiness – Preparation Proposal Formulation grant agreements have been signed representing $98.8 million in allocations to countries. A further seven Readiness Preparation grants have been signed representing firm commitments of approximately $35.1 million and $8.4M has been disbursed in grant to countries.

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $5,000,000

Targeted Region: Developing Countries

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Delivery Channel:

Description

The Carbon Fund builds on the progress made in readiness and is designed to pilot performance-based payments for emission reductions from REDD+ programs in a small number of FCPF countries. The Carbon Fund became operational in 2011.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The Carbon Fund is currently in the process of finalising the methodological framework and pricing approach, and establishing timelines for the submissions and review, and approval of Emission reduction Purchase Agreements (ERPAs). The Fund is expected to provide financial incentives to developing countries that implement emission reduction programs to reduce the rate of deforestation and forest degradation within their country.

Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,900,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2011/2012, 2012/2013

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada provided $1.9 million over two years to the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves to support the deployment of clean cookstoves in: Ghana, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and twelve additional countries in Latin America, Africa and Asia

Results/Expected Outcomes

Canadian funding supported the advancement of seven areas critical to the growth of the clean cooking sector:
  • roll out of the Alliance’s strategic plan and national stakeholder consultations
  • inventory of stove performance data and field testing
  • development of standards
  • market assessments and country action plans
  • launch of a Pilot Innovation Fund to support impementing organizations
  • analysis of black carbon impacts
  • cookstove use and household adoption

Global Environment Facility (GEF)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $170,620,000

Targeted Region: Developing Countries

Funding Period: 2010/2011, 2011/2012, 2012/2013

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada continued to support climate change activities through its contributions to the Global Environment Facility (GEF), of which about a third was estimated to support climate change projects and initiatives under GEF5.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Canada support contributes to the overall $4.2 billion replenishment of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) which is expected to result in the avoidance of greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to 500M tons of CO2. In addition to being the single largest source of funding to address global environment issues such as climate change, desertification and biodiversity, the GEF funding also enables significant developmental co-benefits, such as job creation.

Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) – Implementing the GFCS at Regional and National Scales

Canada’s Total Contribution: $6,138,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2012/2013

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada's contribution to the Global Framework for Climate Services, an international initiative led by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), supported countries by enhancing the global capability of countries to respond to changing and variable climate conditions. This was completed through the provision of better weather, climate and water and related environmental information, predictions and warnings to support impact and adaptation strategies, decision making and actions.

Results/Expected Outcomes

This project is focussed on small island states (SIDs) in the Indian Ocean, Caribbean and Pacific regions, as well as central and south-east Asia and Polar Regions. Users and providers are expected to see the implementation of climate watch systems, regional and national climate outlook fora, drought policies and severe weather and climate event early warning systems through the Regional and National Climate Services Frameworks. This project will also provide policy and management guidance through the coordinated generation of high quality and reliable information on climate matters and through sharing of best practices and knowledge and by enhancing capacity and communication mechanisms.

Green Buildings Product Development Project

Canada’s Total Contribution: $600,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Project Funded through a Canadian Facility: IFC - Canada Climate Change Program (CCCP)

Delivery Channel:

Description

The IFC-Canada Climate Change Program provided support for the development of a web platform for IFC’s green building EDGE (Excellence in Design for Greater Efficiency) tool, as well as development of certification protocol and training materials. EDGE is a software tool that construction companies and housing developers can use to identify options and technical solutions that help reduce energy and water consumption in their projects. The tool and certification have been piloted successfully with IFC clients in several countries.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The launch of the software platform has already taken place, with the issuing of 90 EDGE (Excellence in Design for Greater Efficiency) certifications, covering 5,254 residential units and over 800,000 square meters of floor space. During the last year, the EDGE software was upgraded, and now has over 4,500 users registered. In addition, a new web site has been launched (edgebuildings.com) and the software and website has been translated into Indonesian Bahasa, Spanish, Vietnamese, and Portuguese. Local partners in Costa Rica, Indonesia, Vietnam, India, and South Africa were also joined by the Green Building Council of the Philippines, and marketing and business development training took place in all the above countries.
Additional Finance Mobilized ($CAD): $3,700,000

Green Climate Fund (GCF)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $168,000,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2015/2016

Delivery Channel:

Description

As part of Canada’s $2.65 billion climate finance commitment, Canada is providing $300 million over 2015/16 to 2018/19, to the Green Climate Fund (GCF). The GCF is the largest dedicated international climate fund helping developing countries to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change. It seeks to promote a paradigm shift to low-emission and climate-resilient development, taking into account the needs of nations that are particularly vulnerable to climate change impacts.
Canada is the 10th largest donor of the Fund and supports increasing the impact of climate change adaptation and mitigation investments, while promoting environmental, social, economic and developmental co-benefits and taking a gender-sensitive approach.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The GCF is expected to considerably contribute towards climate change mitigation and adaptation action that helps deliver systemic change in developing countries, in support of the Paris Agreement. The Fund aims for a 50:50 balance between mitigation and adaptation investments over time. It also aims for a floor of 50 percent of the adaptation allocation for particularly vulnerable countries, including Least Developed Countries (LDCs), Small Island Developing States (SIDS), and African States. To date, it has approved US $3.5 billion for 73 climate change projects around the world. These investments are expected to avoid 1.3 billion metric tonnes of CO2 and support 217 million people with increased resilience in the face of climate change, considerably contributing to effective low-emission and climate-resilient development. The GCF is also mobilizing additional public and private finance to combat climate change, scaling up resources to effectively meet the climate challenge. An example of a recently approved GCF-financed project is “Water Sector Resilience Nexus for Sustainability in Barbados”, where climate change is expected to engender severe extreme weather events. This project is creating a sustainable, resilient water supply for Barbados by implementing renewable energy solutions, increasing water capacity through rainwater harvesting and water storage, supporting adaptation funding, and raising awareness about climate change and the water cycle. Expected results include 7,340 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (t CO2 eq) to be reduced or avoided annually, and 189,000 direct beneficiaries from project activities. Another example of a GCF-financed project is “Accelerating the Transformational Shift to a Low-Carbon Economy in the Republic of Mauritius”, aimed at enabling the Government of Mauritius to meet its target of using renewables to supply 35 percent of the country’s energy needs by 2025. This project will remove bottlenecks to investments in low-carbon development and it expects to reduce 213, 350 tonnes of carbon dioxide (t CO2 eq) annually.

IFC - Canada Climate Change Program (CCCP)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $276,550,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Delivery Channel:

Description

The International Finance Corporation (IFC)-Canada Climate Change Program promotes private sector financing for clean energy projects, through the use of concessional funds to catalyze investments in renewable, low-carbon technologies that would not otherwise happen. The program received $276.6 million of Canada's Fast-start finance to invest at concessional, or below market, alongside with IFC’s own funds to enable climate change investments that would not otherwise happen, due to market barriers preventing sponsors or other financiers from making those investments. A portion of the program funds is also used to fund advisory services work to build local capacity, fill information gaps in the market, and enable countries to adopt regulatory and business environments that encourage the private sector to invest in renewable energy, energy efficiency, and cleaner technologies.

IFC and Canada are committed to transparency of climate finance, and to demonstrating leadership in this respect. As such, the IFC-Canada program is piloting the reporting of project-level information on expected greenhouse gas reductions. These are preliminary, up-front estimates based on available information prior to project implementation and evolving methodologies. Actual reductions may be different from these estimates. Canada will continue to monitor and evaluate and report on the results of the program including to update these estimates as they are refined.

Results/Expected Outcomes

International Research Initiative on Adaptation to Climate Change (IRIACC)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $7,207,683

Targeted Region: Multiple

Funding Period: 2009/2010, 2010/2011, 2011/2012, 2012/2013, 2013/2014

Delivery Channel:

  • International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

Description

The International Research Initiative on Adaptation to Climate Change (IRIACC) is a five-year research program (2011-2016) aimed at helping vulnerable populations and sectors adapt to climate change.

IRIACC is advancing knowledge about climate change and related stressors, while enabling the development of tools, technologies and collaborative approaches for adaptation. The program aims to shape policy by sharing research results between jurisdictions to inform adaptation planning.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Research capacity is being built through skills training for young researchers and support for government, the private sector and community leaders to understand and implement research findings.

Five projects, each a partnership between Canadian and developing-country researchers, are researching strategies for adapting to the impacts of climate change. Together with non-academic partners, projects are developing options to help communities in Canada and around the world cope with a changing climate. Examples include applying scientific and indigenous knowledge to help remote populations adapt to changes in food security, reducing the risks for agricultural and indigenous communities to climate variability and extreme climate events, and comparing the vulnerability of communities in the low-lying small-island countries of the Caribbean to those in Atlantic Canada.

Inventories and Measurement Fellowship Program

Canada’s Total Contribution: $500,000

Targeted Region: South Asia and East Africa

Funding Period: 2012/2013

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada's Fast-start contribution to the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) supported research fellowships in Africa and South Asia to allow farmers to test the impacts on greenhouse gas emissions of changes in management practices and use of technology that could boost adaptive capacity and productivity.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Canada’s contribution supported the SAMPLES program (Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems), a multi-tiered program with various partners and institutions. Canada’s funding supported in full, and in part, four main activities:
  • Providing training to strengthen capacity on different elements of GHG measurements, analysis, and data interpretation
  • Conducting spatial analysis to inform site selection, data collection, baselines and mitigation potential
  • Developing GHG measurement protocols. Protocols have been developed in Kenya and Philippines. A draft of a general protocol for quantifying GHG emissions and identifying mitigation options at whole-farm and landscape scales will be published in 2014
  • Conducting data collection for one dry season in Philippines and supporting data collection in Kenya. This data collection tested methods of gas sampling with the potential to reduce lab demand of GHG experiments.

Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $20,000,000

Targeted Region: Least Developed Countries

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Delivery Channel:

  • Least Developed Countries Fund

Description

Canada's fast-start financing contribution supported the Least Developed Countries Fund projects that respond to urgent adaptation needs of least developing countries. The LDCF finances the preparation and implementation of National Adaptation Programmes (NAPA).

Results/Expected Outcomes

With Canada's contribution, the Fund has enabled 48 of the world's most vulnerable countries to access resources for NAPA preparation. The Fund now supports 52 projects and programs in 42 of the least developed countries.

Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $20,000,000

Targeted Region: Least Developed Countries

Funding Period: 2016/2017

Delivery Channel:

  • Least Developed Countries Fund

Description

As part of Canada’s $2.65 billion climate finance commitment, Canada is providing $30 million over 2016/17 to 2017/18, to the Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF). The LDCF, managed by the Global Environment Facility, supports the world’s most vulnerable countries in their efforts to adapt to the effects of climate change. The LDCF provides support to 51 least developed countries that are especially vulnerable to the adverse impacts of climate change for the preparation and implementation of National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPAs), which identify countries’ priorities for adaptation actions. The LDCF also focuses on reducing the vulnerability of the sectors and resources that are central to development and livelihoods, notably: agriculture and food security; health; water; disaster risk management and prevention; infrastructure; and fragile ecosystems. By financing on-the-ground adaptation activities, it provides concrete results in support of vulnerable communities.
This contribution builds on Canada’s previous contribution of $20 million to the LDCF in 2010/11.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The expected objectives of this initiative include: reducing the vulnerability of people, livelihoods, physical assets and natural systems to the adverse effects of climate change; strengthening institutional and technical capacities for effective climate change adaptation; and, integrating climate change adaptation into relevant policies, plans and associated processes. LDCF projects include a variety of themes and geographies. For instance, in Malawi, the LDCF is supporting practical community-level adaptation actions that improve resilience of the agriculture sector, while boosting community economic development. In Niger, land degradation, water scarcity and at-risk livestock pose a deadly threat to rural communities. There, the LDCF supports distribution of drought-resilient crop seeds, and locally appropriate water-harvesting techniques. Lastly, in Samoa, LDCF interventions have resulted in tools such as automated weather stations and crop suitability maps, which help increase food and water security. At the same time, these tools reduce damage from weather-related disasters.

National Adaptation Plans (NAP) Global Network

Canada’s Total Contribution: $2,000,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2017/2018

Delivery Channel:

Description

As part of Canada’s $2.65 billion climate finance commitment, Canada provided $2 million over 2017/18, to the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), for the National Adaptation Plans (NAP) Global Network. The NAP Global Network aims to enhance national adaptation planning and action in developing countries and to facilitate international peer learning and exchange. This funding will help developing countries to build their capacity to plan, develop and implement climate change adaptation actions, while supporting them in the process to formulate and implement National Adaptation Plans and promote the effective implementation of the Paris Agreement. Canada's support will also facilitate peer-learning and knowledge exchange by convening workshops, forums and other events for developing countries, including particularly vulnerable south Pacific small island developing states.

Results/Expected Outcomes

With support from Canada’s contribution, the NAP Global Network convened training workshops to provide developing countries with practical information and share best practices on developing and implementing National Adaptation Plans. One of the workshops, held in Fiji, enabled a wide range of adaptation policy-makers and adaptation practitioners to build their capacity to integrate gender considerations into their national adaptation planning process, enhance their communication on adaptation, and design, implement and utilize measurement and evaluation tools. Funding also enabled Fiji, to launch its national adaptation plan framework, which will help build national capacity to design and implement medium- and long-term adaptation solutions. In addition, Canada's funding has enabled other developing countries, including Kiribati, and the Solomon Islands to explore options to strengthen gender considerations as part of their adaptation planning at the national level.

Strengthening Community Resilience to Natural Disasters

Canada’s Total Contribution: $2,160,027

Targeted Region: South Asia

Funding Period: 2013/2014, 2014/2015

Delivery Channel:

Description

This project seeks to reduce people's vulnerability to natural disasters throughout Southeast Asia, with a particular focus on women and children. The project aims to increase the resilience of Southeast Asians to natural disasters by helping communities to work with national governments and regional organizations to establish more effective disaster risk reduction plans and policies. The project will strengthen the ability of national Red Cross Societies and regional organizations to represent and communicate the needs of vulnerable groups who are often more severely affected by disasters. This is undertaken in part through support for laws and policies for disaster risk that also take into account issues related to vulnerable communities, gender equality, and the environment. The project will contribute to the development and implementation of work-plans on disaster risk reduction and support the Red Cross National Societies to build awareness and skills related to International Disaster Response Law at the regional, national and community levels.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The expected intermediate results for this project include improved representation of community issues, including gender equality issues, in national disaster risk reduction policies, plans and programs, as well as increased effectiveness of Southeast Asia regional disaster risk reduction cooperation mechanisms that address the needs of vulnerable communities, with emphasis on women and children.

Results achieved to date include the strengthening of cooperation and coordination among Southeast Asia climate change action and disaster preparedness mechanisms and the establishment of a pool of 174 trained staff and volunteers to champion climate change mainstreaming within the community programming of the Red Cross Red Crescent (RCRC) National Societies. In addition, the project supports an exploration by the Canadian Red Cross Society of ways to work with government counter-parts to follow-up on their COP21 commitments. By supporting advocacy on the importance of climate-smart programming, and contributing to the disaster risk reduction (DRR) goals of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the Government of Canada, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and the Red Cross Red Crescent (RCRC) National Societies are ensuring the integration of climate change into DRR policies, plans, and decision-making processes.

Support for the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) to reduce short-lived climate pollutants

Canada’s Total Contribution: $13,000,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2012/2013

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada's Fast-start contribution to the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) provided support to the CCAC and developing partner countries for the implementation of initiatives that will reduce the emissions of short-lived climate pollutants. The CCAC is committed to taking concrete and substantial action-oriented work to promote the near-term reductions of SLCPs in various sectors at a substantial scale worldwide with the engagement of high-level stakeholders.

Results/Expected Outcomes

An initial $3 million contribution provided kick-start funding for initiatives in developing countries with a view of reducing short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) as agreed by the CCAC's Steering Committee. An additional $10 million provided funding to support the implementation of the CCAC’s initiatives which will lead to the reduction of short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) at a significant scale. The initiatives to be supported include mitigating SLCPs from landfills and municipal solid waste, reducing black carbon emissions from heavy duty diesel vehicles and engines, reducing SLCPs from brick production, promoting hydro fluorocarbons (HFC) alternative technology and standards, reducing SLCPs from household cooking and domestic heating, reducing SLCPs from the agriculture sector and accelerating methane and black carbon reductions from oil and natural gas production, amongst others.

Support for United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Trust Fund for Supplementary Activities

Canada’s Total Contribution: $250,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2013/2014

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada provided support to the United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change (UNFCCC) Trust Fund for Supplementary Activities to support capacity building activities to assist developing countries in undertaking mitigation, adaptation and reporting actions, and to support Peru in preparations for the 20th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP20).

Results/Expected Outcomes

This contribution will support the engagement of international organizations that promote the reduction of emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHGs).

Support to the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Adaptation for Smallholder Agriculture Programme 2012

Canada’s Total Contribution: $19,849,000

Targeted Region: Developing Countries

Funding Period: 2011/2012

Delivery Channel:

Description

This grant represents Canada’s support to the Adaptation for Smallholder Agriculture Programme (ASAP) of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD). The main objective of ASAP is to help poor rural smallholder farming communities withstand the effects of climate change and weather related disasters. The programme achieves this objective by supporting the creation and sharing of knowledge, approaches and practices related to climate change adaptation. CIDA’s support to ASAP expects to help farmers reduce their crop yield losses, gain increased access to water supplies, use water resources more efficiently, and build individual and community level capacity to adapt to climate change.
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Results/Expected Outcomes

Launched in 2012, Adaptation for Smallholder Agriculture Program (ASAP) is working with developing countries to increase knowledge and investments in climate-smart agriculture. For example, to cope with recurrent flooding in Bangladesh, ASAP will enhance village protection (including the improvement of rural feeder roads to enable access to markets during the flood season), develop integrated food production systems with alternative rice varieties in rehabilitated swamp forests, and develop the capacity of rural institutions to manage climate risk. These investments will improve living standards and reduce community vulnerability, directly benefiting 115,000 poor rural households.

Support to the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol

Canada’s Total Contribution: $10,843,469

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2013/2014, 2014/2015

Delivery Channel:

Description

This contribution represents Canada’s long-term institutional support to the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (MFMP). The Multilateral Fund provides support to developing countries to help phase out the use and production of substances that break down the earth's protective ozone layer, allowing increased ultraviolet radiation that is detrimental to human health and diminishes the productivity of important food crops.

This project demonstrates Canada’s dedication to climate change action in developing countries. The Multilateral Fund promotes reduction in the consumption and production of ozone-depleting substances in developing countries. This is done by facilitating the use of environmentally safe products and equipment through technical assistance, the conversion of industrial facilities, and strengthening key organizations. Canada, as part of the MFMP, has also agreed to assist in the phase down hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), greenhouse gases that can be hundreds to thousands of times more potent than carbon dioxide, used extensively for air-conditioning and refrigeration.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved to date include the Multilateral Fund for the Implementation of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (MFMP) assisting to phase out 481,653 tonnes of ozone-depleting potential in 144 countries. Assuming continued compliance with the Montreal Protocol, the ozone layer outside the Polar Regions is expected to recover to its pre-1980 levels before 2050.

In addition, Canada was involved in the adoption of an amendment to the Montreal Protocol to phase-down HFCs, in Kigali, Rwanda. In 2017, Canada will continue to play a leadership role in implementing the Montreal Protocol, including the HFC amendment, by hosting the 29th Meeting of the Parties, which marks the Montreal Protocol’s 30th anniversary.

Sustainable Energy Access for the Latin American and Caribbean Region

Canada’s Total Contribution: $2,621,734

Targeted Region: Americas

Funding Period: 2011/2012, 2012/2013, 2013/2014

Delivery Channel:

Description

This project supports the improved access to sustainable and affordable energy needed to promote economic growth in the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) region. This is undertaken by improving capacities for energy planning, management and regulation across countries in the region and facilitating the dissemination and implementation of corporate social responsibility best practices and principles in the energy sector.

This project demonstrates Canada’s dedication to climate change action in developing countries. Through the Latin American Energy Organization (known by its Spanish acronym, OLADE) the project is providing assistance to countries in Latin America and the Caribbean to help them develop policies and programs to support climate change mitigation and adaptation activities in their energy sectors. Canada’s support has helped OLADE to develop a responsive mechanism to assist member countries in developing climate change mitigation and adaptation activities, and assisted Nicaragua and Colombia in developing climate change adaptation strategies for, respectively, their hydropower and hydrocarbon sectors.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved to date include the training of 20,785 energy sector personnel throughout the Latin America and Caribbean region via virtual training programs in various aspects of energy sector planning, management, and development. This exceeded the expectation of the project to train 7000 personnel. In addition, the project supported the development of a replicable methodology to guide energy companies in the implementation of corporate social responsibility principles, based on case studies in Central America and subsequent regional workshops. There was also an improvement of laws, regulations, and policies implemented in Guatemala, Honduras, Colombia, and Haiti, covering key aspects of energy sector development and management, including such issues as hydrocarbon production, resource taxation and tariffs, and environmental protection. In addition, a sustainable hydropower and electrical distribution system was established in rural Guatemala in collaboration with the Guatemalan government and private sector, benefitting 125 households and small enterprises in three isolated communities.

The Climate Technology Centre and Network

Canada’s Total Contribution: $2,500,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2012/2013

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada provided support for the operationalization of the Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN) and its objective to enhance the development and deployment of environmentally sound technologies in support of action on mitigation and adaptation.

Results/Expected Outcomes

It is expected that activities funded under this program will support the development and deployment of clean technologies, help to facilitate opportunities for private sector engagement in international technology cooperation, help the development of capacity building in developing countries, and help to make progress in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change's objectives. Canada’s contribution supports the administration and work of the CTCN, which will facilitate connections between clean technology experts and developing countries looking for technical support to enhance their capacity in climate change mitigation and adaptation. It is expected that the CTCN will receive its first project proposals from developing countries in 2014. Project outcomes will be realized over 2012-2013 and 2015-2016.

UNFCCC Trust Fund for Participation

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,000,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2010/2011

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada provided support to the United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change (UNFCCC) - Trust Fund for Participation to work towards the development of a strategy aimed at disseminating results and showcasing successes with a view to achieving broader impact. Canada's investment was combined with an additional $240,000 from other resources for a total contribution of $1 million to this initiative.

Results/Expected Outcomes

This support from Canada enabled the participation of developing country representative at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 16th Conference of the Parties in Cancun, Mexico, a milestone conference that adopted the Cancun Agreements which bring the world closer to implementing the mechanisms and commitments made under the Copenhagen Accord.

United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change (UNFCCC) Supplementary Fund

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,650,000

Targeted Region: Global

Funding Period: 2011/2012, 2012/2013

Delivery Channel:

Description

As part of Canada's fast-start contribution to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC); the Supplementary Fund provided developing countries with technical activities that help them implement their goals and commitments under the UNFCCC, such as having high quality national inventories, deploying clean technology, or developing national adaptation strategies.

Results/Expected Outcomes

With support from Canada's contribution, two training workshops have been held which provided developing countries with practical information on setting up and carrying out national mitigation assessments. One of the workshops, held in Bangkok, enabled a wide range of national experts from 32 developing countries to build their capacity to undertake mitigation assessments. Funding also enabled compilation of case studies on national adaptation planning processes, including approaches used for the implementation of actions, building also on previous adaptation planning activities undertaken under the Nairobi work programme; as well as the development of technical guidelines for the national adaptation plan process.

University of the West Indies (UWI) Enhancing Knowledge and Application of Comprehensive Disaster Management (CDM)

Canada’s Total Contribution: $177,557

Targeted Region: Latin America and the Caribbean

Funding Period: 2013/2014

Delivery Channel:

Description

Canada's contribution supported the Disaster Risk Reduction Centre of the Institute for Sustainable Development at the University of West Indies to establish an effective and collaborative mechanism for managing and sharing Comprehensive Disaster Management (CDM) knowledge that will be established and used for decision-making by governments, local communities and the private sector.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Canada's contribution supported the training of 19 interns in gender equality and environmental sustainability, helping them acquire an enhanced understanding of gender equality, environmental sustainability and marine resources management in their respective countries.
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