Guatemala

Map of Guatemala

Country Initiatives Details

Adapting community-based water supply in Central America to a changing climate

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,480,000

Targeted Countries: Costa Rica Guatemala Nicaragua

Funding Period: 2011/2012

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

This contribution is part of Canada's $20 million fast-start contribution to the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) to support climate change adaptation projects in the water sector in Asia and in Latin America and the Caribbean. The project studied the effects of climate change on water availability in Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica, and will investigate how community-based organizations could adapt their practices to maximize water security for rural and peri-urban residents.

Results/Expected Outcomes

With support from Canada’s contribution, the project is assessing how water suppliers can adapt their practices to safeguard water given the uncertainty about future water availability. Case analysis from Costa Rica is being used to assess appropriate adaptation options. The team is conducting a survey of households and water providers from Guatemala, Costa Rica and Nicaragua, with a focus on assessing the costs and benefits of different adaptation measures. Research results are expected to improve decision-making and better guide private and public investments in adaptation measures, to secure water supply for rural and peri-urban residents.

Water security and climate change in Central America and the Caribbean

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,490,000

Targeted Countries: Dominican Republic Guatemala

Funding Period: 2011/2012

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

This contribution is part of Canada's $20 million fast-start contribution to the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) to support climate change adaptation projects in the water sector in Asia and in Latin America and the Caribbean. This project aimed at investigating how climate change adaptation and investment policies can integrate local vulnerabilities to climate change, by examining four pilot municipalities located in the watersheds of the Samala and Yaque Norte rivers in Guatemala and the Dominican Republic respectively.

Results/Expected Outcomes

The project has identified present and future water sector vulnerabilities to climate change at the regional level. Preliminary results also confirm limited investments at the local level for initiatives relating to climate change adaptation and water resources. A capacity building workshop was held on May 13-18, 2013 in Panama City, bringing together students and researchers from collaborating institutions to discuss water and climate modeling. Researchers have effectively fostered collaboration with national partners. A first scientific article stemming from this project is being prepared.

Reducing Guatemala’s Socio-Environmental Vulnerability to Climate Change by focusing on, promoting and developing the PINPEP Forest Policy Instrument

Canada’s Total Contribution: $483,178

Targeted Countries: Guatemala

Funding Period: 2012/2013

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

Canada provided support to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) for the implementation of a Guatemalan government initiative. This initiative offers incentives to smallholders for sustainable forestry practices, in order to improve climate change adaptation and strengthen institutional and local capacities in forest management in Guatemala.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Canada's financial contribution helped to strengthen the implementation efficiency and effectiveness of the PINPEP program through developments such as a validated map of prioritized climate-vulnerable areas for PINPEP, financial instrument to support the implementation of PINPEP in local communities and facilitation of climate change adaptation practices, applicable to forest-dwelling local and indigenous communities.

Promoting Sustainable Economic Growth in Coffee-growing Regions

Canada’s Total Contribution: $1,042,198

Targeted Countries: Guatemala Honduras

Funding Period: 2014/2015

Delivery Partner(s):

Description

This project aims to improve the lives of smallholder coffee farmers in the Trifinio region and other coffee growing regions of Guatemala and Honduras by increasing the productivity of their farms, improving the profitability of coffee production, and expanding exports to international markets. Key activities will promote sustainable agricultural practices, improve farm management, and enable smallholder coffee farmers to increase their yields. The project expects to reach 6,000 smallholder coffee farmers and benefit about 30,000 people, including farmers and their families.

This project demonstrates Canada’s dedication to climate change action in developing countries. Project activities will involve reducing poverty while promoting environmental sustainability, gender equality, and youth engagement.

Results/Expected Outcomes

Results achieved to date include the adoption of good agricultural and farm management practices by 57% of farmers (872 in total and 378 women) and the participation of 602 women in leadership groups/networks, in which 150 youth (44% female) developed a career plan. These results have contributed to improvements in coffee yields, increased women’s participation in decision-making within the family farming enterprise, and increased the ability for youth to take action toward their employability.

Working with non-governmental organizations in the region, the project provides technical assistance on good agricultural practices to coffee farmers, including assisting them to adapt to the effects of climate change. Key adaptation techniques promoted include increasing plant resistance, the use of cover crops to reduce soil temperature and erosion, and using drip irrigation and drone imagery for production monitoring. Thirty-three demonstration plots have been established to teach farmers about climate adaptation practices. At one of the project sites, 53% of coffee farmers are now using organic matter to increase the soil’s nutrient absorption capacity, thereby enhancing their climate resilience.

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